Good/Well

Introduction

Good is an adjective and well is an adverb. It’s not always is easy to know which one to choose and sometimes even native speakers get confused.

Michaela is a good tennis player. She practises every day which is why she plays so well.

Ben is checking her tennis racket and says that the strings feel good.

Ben is good at his job. He sells a lot of tennis rackets because he has a well-rehearsed speech.

Michaela isn’t feeling well today so she’s won’t be playing tennis later.

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Good

  • Good is an adjective. Use it to describe nouns.
Examples:
Michaela is a good tennis player.
  • Use good after linking verbs (appear, be, become, seem, feel, look, smell, taste etc).
Example:
The tennis racket feels good. (not: feels well)
Ben is good at his job. (not: Ben is well at his job.)
  • Linking verbs connect a noun with an adjective. To check if a verb is a linking verb or not replace it with be. If the sentence still makes sense then the verb is a linking verb.
Example:
The soup tastes good.
The soup is good.

Well

  • Well is an adverb. Use it to describe verbs, adjectives or other adverbs.
Example:
Michaela plays tennis well.
  • Use well with actions verbs such as dance, walk, jump, swim, laugh, speak, eat etc.
Example:
Ben sells tennis rackets well.
  • Use well with past participles to describe nouns.
Example:
Ben has a well-rehearsed speech.
  • Use well as adjective that means in good health.
Example:
Michaela isn’t feeling well today.